Varying Degrees of Excitement

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Remembering Nelson Mandela

In this post I’m going to attract the attention of nobody while I discuss Nelson Mandela. The same man who was portrayed as a silent peace-loving, wrongly persecuted leader by Morgan Freeman, and the same man Google has decided to honor today. But first, the anthem of the MK, the military wing of the Marxist African National Congress. 

            “‘Go safely UmkhontoUmkhonto we Sizwe. We the members of the Umkhonto have pledged ourselves to kill them — kill the whites.”

The MK was established and commanded by Nelson Mandela to use tactics of terrorism to end Apartheid. Ending Apartheid? Great! Using public bombings such that you kill more men, women, and children than the 7,000 reportedly killed by the actual regime? Bad, very bad.

But it’s not the execution that matters, Onion, its the motivation! Ok, what was Mandela’s motivation? Is it really so true that he fought tooth or nail for human rights? Or did he just exploit the unjust system of Apartheid to prop up Communist rule?

Lets let the man defend himself. Let’s hear about the men and governments he idolized: Fidel Castro’s rule over Cuba, and the totalitarian regimes of North Korea and Iran.

So why is a man who advocated the use of ‘necklacing’ (burning a tire around a victim’s neck) and worked alongside soviet-trained terrorists so popular in the West? Simple: ignorance and embarrassment. Ignorance because most people don’t know or will ignore the facts I’ve written here. Embarrassment because Western countries believe idolizing the man absolve them of any racism they may have been accused of. By painting the man as an equality touting peace-loving man, many all around the world can consider their penance done just by honoring him a few days of the year.    

 

artbooksnat:

Bad guys only! Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagan (天元突破グレンラガン) baddies illustrated by Hiroyuki Imaishi (今石 洋之). 

artbooksnat:

Bad guys only! Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagan (天元突破グレンラガン) baddies illustrated by Hiroyuki Imaishi (今石 洋之). 

youfilthycasual:

…is it bad that I only just realised this?
(also, if you didn’t get the Summer of Love reference:)


A Cold War setting like Berlin or war-torn Vietnam would win me over. I’m too damn excited by the idea of living out a John Le Carre novel not to buy ANY well-realized Cold War spy game that comes my way

youfilthycasual:

…is it bad that I only just realised this?

(also, if you didn’t get the Summer of Love reference:)

A Cold War setting like Berlin or war-torn Vietnam would win me over. I’m too damn excited by the idea of living out a John Le Carre novel not to buy ANY well-realized Cold War spy game that comes my way

kerfufflecat:

you sure about that

kerfufflecat:

you sure about that

brocflower:

Finding it, though, that’s not the hard part. It’s letting go." x

SirOnion Reviews: The Wolf Among Us (No Spoilers)

As someone who bought the season pass at the time the first episode came out- and has played each episode around their release date for the last three quarters of a year- I think it’s about time I reflected on this thang, now that I’ve played the final chapter.

If you’ve played a Telltale game, you can probably already tell what the positive aspects of this game are. It’s visual style makes it unique and benefits the noire atmosphere quite nicely. The main characters are well realized, Bigby especially. It’s been a while since I controlled a protagonist this fleshed-out and interesting. Telltale has a nice eye for detail, something and knows how to set a tone. Some scenes are humorous, others grim, and still others triumphant or exciting. I could go on and on about the rich characters, setting, and well-written dialogue, but you’ll hear that from just about every other player out there. Instead I’ll move on to some complaints of mine.

First off, the story’s not perfect. Most of the flaws or hiccups in the story actually find their origins in Episode 2, which seemed rushed and failed to really progress the narrative. There’s a character in the final chapter who seemed to come out of nowhere (especially because of their importance to the main plot). There’s a reveal that’s more tame than it is shocking, and the primary villains, for all of their claimed power, seem far too easy to topple. 

My primary complaint with this game is when I think of the potential the premise held for a game. What if we had actually been able to INVESTIGATE the crime scenes rather than just walk around clicking on button prompts. What if interrogating suspects were a more crucial part of the case? And finally, why doesn’t this game provide the player any freedom whatsoever? I can only imagine how much I’d like this game if I could walk Bigby around town, choose the next place to investigate, character to question, etc. There could even be some recreational stuff with Colin. I’d understand the more restricted game-play, including point and click fight scenes, if the story had gone drastically different directions based on my decisions, but it rarely ever did.

TLDR: Telltale succeeds in almost everything they were trying to do thanks to a stylized atmosphere and well-executed narrative, but some of the restrictions on player input left me unimpressed. Nevertheless, if fantastical noire sounds like you’re kind of thing, you’ll definitely want to check this out. 

7/10 

Also I think it’s worth noting that Fables fans might react completely differently to this game. They might love it or hate it based on its interpretation of the Fables world. Tough to judge.